Tag Archives: Adele

High Heels and Little girls

Recently I observed a 3-year-old girl with her family in a restaurant. She

little-girl-570864_640was having difficulty walking due to the heels on her sandals. I actually understand her desire to be “more grown up.” However, I did feel sad and curious about a cultural paradigm that promotes preschoolers to be hobbling in order to look thinner.

You might be saying “But she wasn’t trying to look thinner. She was just copying Mommy, or wanting to play dress up.” To which I would say “And why was Mommy wearing high heels?” I was at a [dress up] event for parents of young children recently and one of the dads curiously asked “why DO women wear high heels?” To which I heard a mom reply:

“To enhance their legs or look thinner.”

I myself have worn high heels (though much less after becoming a mom as walking/running/getting shoes dirty and protecting my back have become more important). There is nothing wrong with wanting to feel and look attractive. However, I do question certain underlying values including

  • Looking-good-is-more-important-than-being-yourself;
  • Looking-thin-or-smaller-is-more-important-than-being-able-to-walk; or
  • A woman’s-value-is-in-their-appearance-rather-than-their-skills, abilities, or being.

The comedian Jim Gaffigan (Dad is Fat, New York: Three Rivers Press, 2013) riffs on the ridiculous-ness of  this strange cultural phenomena  when he talks about the obsessive interest in his newborn baby girl’s weight:

The masses of family and friends want to …get information on the baby. For some reason, it’s really important for people to know how much the baby weighs. This always baffled me. ‘How much does she weigh?’ That’s rude. She’s not even a day old, and people seem to be obsessed with my daughter’s weight? She was nine pounds, but I remember telling friends, ‘She was eight pounds, sixteen ounces’ because it sounded thinner. Either way, she carried the weight very well, but we put her on the Atkins diet anyway…

My latest celebrity hero is Adele: not because I like her music or even follow celebrities much. But because she is one voice of opposition within the airbrushed media culture challenging lies such as:

  • Looking Good= You will Not Suffer or Die and
  • You can never be too rich or too thin.

She is speaking out, modeling for women and mothers, that is it okay to be yourself, in the size that you are. There are more valuable compasses from which to steer your life than appearance. Though admitting to some body image problems, she states:

“I think I remind everyone of themselves…I’m not perfect. I don’t let [body image problems] rule my life…I’m motivated by … a legacy that I’m leaving for my child.”*

Amen to that.

*Us Weekly, “Adele Choosing Family Over Fame,” Issue 1086, December 7, 2015.

 

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