Tag Archives: secondary trauma

Wildfires, trauma, and self-care

Since I live in an area where wildfires have been devastating communities, this is some of what I’m hearing in therapy this week:

“I’m having trouble breathing.”

“Should I keep my child home from school or make them wear a face mask?”

image from NBC bay area

Photo image from NBC bay area

“Three of my friends just lost their houses.”

“I can’t seem to focus.”

“I was just starting to get my head around the Las Vegas shooting and now this.”

“I don’t even know how to take care of myself right now.”

“Donating bags of supplies doesn’t seem like enough.”

“I’t’s just one disaster after another- I’m not sure I want to bring my children up in this world.”

These are from people living near the wildfires. Not the ones who directly lost their houses, schools, churches in the fire. So you can only imagine the trauma for those impacted even more directly.

A Little About Trauma:

What is trauma? According to the APA (American Psychological Association) trauma can be defined as:

“an emotional response to a terrible event like an accident, rape or natural disaster. Immediately after the event, shock and denial are typical. Longer term reactions include unpredictable emotions, flashbacks, strained relationships and… physical symptoms like headaches or nausea. While these feelings are normal, some people have difficulty moving on with their lives. Psychologists can help these individuals find constructive ways of managing their emotions.”

Secondary trauma can be defined as “the stress resulting from helping or wanting to help a traumatized or suffering person.” (Figley, C.R., Ed., 1995).

According to Secondarytrauma.org, some of the symptoms of secondary trauma include:

  • intrusive thoughts
  • chronic fatigue
  • sadness
  • anger
  • poor concentration
  • second guessing
  • detachment
  • emotional exhaustion
  • fearfulness

Many caregivers, therapists, nurses, firefighters, emergency providers, and what I call “senstives” or “empaths” experience secondary trauma. Secondary trauma can result from working directly with people who experienced trauma.

But what can we do about it?

If you are feeling the effects of trauma, here are some thoughts on self-care.

  1. Physical self-care 

A friend of mine said recently, “I feel like a baby. I don’t even know how to take care of myself during this.” Actually, thinking of baby self-care is a good clue as to what you may need. Babies need physical care and tending. If you are able to, keep regular routines of sleep, meals/snacks, hygiene (showers and baths), and stay hydrated. Obviously, physical self-care also includes staying in a safe house or shelter. In the bay area, many hotels, air b and b’s, and nearby friends/family members/colleagues are offering shelter for those who have lost their house or residence due to the fires.

2. Emotional Self-Care

When thinking about a time when you have felt grounded, ask yourself what you were doing? It may have been journalling, meditating, or spending time with a dear friend. Although tempting to NOT do these things during times of crisis, it is actually even more important to do them. This is the directive of “put your own oxygen mask on first.” You cannot be of service to others of you are unable to breathe yourself.

3. Help others

Note this comes third on the list. After you make sure you are taken care of and resourced, then you can give, whether it be through providing housing, volunteering, donating supplies, or emotionally supporting people affected by the disaster.

If you are a parent:

Here’s a beautiful acronym/summary of ways to support your child during/after a disaster or emergency from Alberta Health Services:

R.E.A.C.T.

Remove yourself and your loved ones from danger. During an emergency or disaster, finding shelter, water, and food is the first step. Staying safe and keeping calm is important in helping you and your child in an emergency.

Eat nutritious food and drink water.

Activity. Return to your normal routine as quickly and much as possible. Try to do what your family normally did before the event (e.g., eat meals together, walk together, play games, read).

In Conclusion:

Take care of yourself! One of the gifts of both recovery and of disasters is that it forces asking questions such as: What is most important? And what do I need to take care of myself right now? Here’s to living our way into those answers.

As always, this blog is not intended to provide or replace psychological treatment.

Resources:

Mentis in Napa county is one of many mental health centers in the bay area providing mental health support at low fee currently for victims of the California wildfires.          707-255-0966 ext 132 http://mentisnapa.org/our-services/#mental

The National Center for PTSD is a good resource for information on trauma recovery: https://www.ptsd.va.gov

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